• Wine producers since 1847

    Five generations of the same family have been cultivating vines with the same passion.

  • A unique knowledge

    Optimum ageing in traditional 18th century cellars.

  • High environmental value certified

    High quality, eco-friendly grape production.

  • Champagnes from 3 different Champagne grapes

    Pinot Meunier, Pinot Noir and Chardonnay, from 9 different crus

  • The spirit of the House

    A 160 year-old passion

    Since 1847, a passion for the vineyard has been passed down through generations in the MICHEL Family.

    At the heart of the vineyards of the Champagne region, several kilometres from Epernay, in the commune of Moussy, spread the firm’s 12 hectares of vineyards, planted with Pinot Meunier, Chardonnay and Pinot Noir.Continue reading

  • The spirit of the House

    Passion, Reason and Love, the best kind of heritage.

    Established in 1847, and therefore with more than 160 years of viticultural tradition in Champagne, is this enough to produce a good champagne?

    Heritage only becomes valuable if it is maintained, enriched, and sublimated before being passed on.
    The heritage to which we refer is a skilful mix of passion, reason and love.Continue reading

The vintages

The uniqueness of our vintages stems from their blending: the art of treating vintages from various years and regions. The taste and identity of our Champagne is owed to the secret to its development. Discover our Champagnes
  • The vineyards and the seasons

    Spring

    The vineyard awakens as soon as the first signs of the warm weather start to appear. The roots of the vines are then able to draw the sap from the soil, which spreads to the end of the branches. The vines grow so quickly that the sap appears on the end of the vine shoots like tears…We therefore say in French that the vine is “crying”. This is a sign that it is the height of Spring. The first buds open progressively and tiny, fragile leaves appear here and there.

  • The vineyards and the seasons

    Spring

    BONDING: As the vine grows and blossoms, it is necessary to guide the vine’s growth by attaching wood and string.

  • The vineyards and the seasons

    Spring

    BUD BREAK: The vine awakens when the heat from the sun reaches an average of 10°C. The buds break and the leaves appear.

  • The vineyards and the seasons

    Summer

    The vineyard comes to life when the first signs of warm weather appear. The roots then grow sap in the soil, which is carried to the extremity of branches. The push is so strong that sap even appears on the vine shoots We therefore say that the vine is “crying”.
    This is the signal for the spring pruning. The first buds open gradually and tiny leaves, still fragile, open up.

  • The vineyards and the seasons

    Summer

    BINDING: The vine grows and blossoms. It is therefore necessary to guide it, by attaching the branches of the vine to string.

  • The vineyards and the seasons

    Summer

    BUD BREAK: The vineyard comes to life as soon as the sun reaches an average temperature of 10°C. The buds break out and leaves appear.

  • The vineyards and the seasons

    Autumn

    With the end of the summer arrives the harvesting period, when the wine growing and wine making phases come together. The character and performance of the vines depend on the thoroughness and care given to the vine. However, climatic conditions also influence the quality of the blossoming and of the carpophore.

    The date of harvest is then set by the C.I.V.C. (Comité Interprofessionnel du Vin de Champagne, or the Interprofessional Committee of Champagne Wine) which manages the shared interests of wine producers and merchants in the Champagne region.

  • The vineyards and the seasons

    Autumn

    WORK IN THE CELLAR: The grapes arrive at the press in 50-kilogram boxes. They are then delicately pressed in order to obtain a clear-coloured juice, before any impurities are removed. Yeast is then added, and the precious juice then undergoes its initial phase of alcoholic fermentation, turning it into wine.

    PRE-PRUNING: In order to prevent the wood from becoming too hard, the vines are pre-pruned as much as possible as of when the first leaves start to fall. This enables them to be pruned more easily in winter.

  • The vineyards and the seasons

    Autumn

    COVER PLANTING: This plant covering between the rows of vines encourages the roots of the vine to take water from lower down in the soil. This practice enables wine growers to obtain a more subtle-tasting wine, and ensures the protection of the soil’s surface, which limits risks of streaming and erosion.

    RIPENING: The hundred days after the blossoming constitute a decisive period. The skin of the grape begins to change colour, their acidity decreases and the fruit begins to be filled with sugar. However, the ripening of the grape varies depending on the grape variety and the climate.

  • The vineyards and the seasons

    Winter

    The winter provides the vine with the rest essential to its biological cycle. Indeed, it has just completed an extremely strenuous period involving plant growth and the ripening of the grapes. The birds then steal the last grape seeds softened by the first frosts. The earth goes back to work when the first blending takes place, under the watchful eye of the winegrower.
    It then becomes time for the pruning, which will under no circumstances disturb the grape variety’s vegetative rest.

  • The vineyards and the seasons

    Winter

    PRUNING: Pruning is carried out between December and March. This delicate and time-consuming operation can only be done by hand. It consists in choosing the buds for the season to come.

  • The vineyards and the seasons

    Winter

    DORMANCY: With the drop in temperature, the wine enters the vegetative dormancy phase.

Photo gallery

Contact us

Champagne Jean Michel - Access mapFather-son wine makers since 1847, our House is located at the heart of the vineyards of the Champagne region, several kilometres from Epernay, in the commune of Moussy.

Feel free to phone or email Florence to arrange a visit, so that we can welcome you in the best possible conditions.

15 rue Jean Jaurès 51530 MOUSSY / E-mail : champagnejeanmichel@yahoo.fr / Tél. : +33 (0)3 26 54 03 33

Leave a comment Directions

© Champagne Jean MICHEL. All rights reserved. Alcohol abuse is dangerous to health. Consume with moderation.